Enhancing Facial Recognition Privacy

A Privacy Enhanced Facial Recognition Access Control System Using Biometric Encryption

Biometric authentication is seen as a mixed offering, the ease and comfort of a system that knows who you are without you having to work to prove it (as with a password) is balanced against the need to store personal information and the potential problems if the system is abused.

Orane Cole and Khalil El-Khatib at The University of Ontario Institute of Technology proposed a privacy enhanced facial recognition access control system that uses biometric encryption, smartphones, and NFC at the 2017, 13th International Conference on Distributed Computing in Sensor Systems (DCOSS).

Biometric encryption transforms biometric information in such a way it is unidentifiable, but still can be accurately compared with the source (e.g. a face). In the real world, our face and our environment change constantly. As we are unable to present a consistent image to our device it is forced to make approximate matches between our stored face data and the face this device is presented with.  This is a difficult operation for devices as it requires matching that is imprecise yet still reliable; or ‘fuzzy’ matching.

The scheme presented by Cole and El-Khatib may be a suitable approach to enhance the privacy of traditional biometric schemes and their stored biometric templates.

O. Cole and K. El-Khatib, “A Privacy Enhanced Facial Recognition Access Control System Using Biometric Encryption,” 2017 13th International Conference on Distributed Computing in Sensor Systems (DCOSS), Ottawa, ON, 2017, pp. 199-206.
doi: 10.1109/DCOSS.2017.19

URL: http://ieeexplore.ieee.org/stamp/stamp.jsp?tp=&arnumber=8271965&isnumber=8271927

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